Jude’s Doxology

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Last week Jude told us to have mercy as we looked at three groups of people in the church under various levels of influence from the creepers. False teaching is happening in churches all over and we must do what we can to refute that bad teaching while consistently demonstrating the love of Christ to those that are around us. This morning, Jude gives us a closing expression of praise known as a doxology.

Jude 24-25 says, “Now to Him who is able to keep you from stumbling, and to make you stand in the presence of His glory blameless with great joy, to the only God our Savior, through Jesus Christ our Lord, be glory, majesty, dominion and authority, before all time and now and forever. Amen.”

Why not just say, see ya? Many letters on the Bible finish with a benediction or a blessing. 2 Cor. 13:14 says, “The grace of the Lord Jesus Christ, and the love of God, and the fellowship of the Holy Spirit, be with you all.” 2 Tim. 4:22 says, “The Lord be with your spirit, grace be with you.” Heb. 13:25 simply says, “Grace be with you all.” The blessing is a nice, tidy way to wrap up a letter. It’s  a sign off with some comfort. A closing bit of encouragement.

So if the blessing is a bit of encouragement, the doxology reminds us of the heart and soul of our Christian walk of faith. Other writers have used doxologies instead of benedictions. In Rom. 16:25-27 Paul closes by saying, “Now to Him who is able to establish you according to my gospel and the preaching of Jesus Christ, according to the revelation of the mystery which has been kept secret for long ages past, but now is manifested, and by the Scriptures of the prophets, according to the commandment of the eternal God, has been made known to all the nations, leading to obedience of faith; to the only wise God, through Jesus Christ, be the glory forever. Amen.” In Eph. 3:20-21 he wrote, “Now to Him who is able to do far more abundantly beyond all that we ask or think, according to the power that works within us, to Him be the glory in the church and in Christ Jesus to all generations forever and ever. Amen.” Peter closed his second letter by saying, “You therefore, beloved, knowing this beforehand, be on your guard so that you are not carried away by the error of unprincipled men and fall from your own steadfastness, but grow in the grace and knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ. To Him be the glory, both now and to the day of eternity. Amen.” (2 Pet. 3:17-18) Jude’s closing follows the same four point pattern as other doxologies.        God is the person deserving of the praise. Glory and honor are bestowed on Him. There is no ending to the praise ascribed to God. And finally, there is the traditional amen.

In looking at the first three aspects of the doxology, we see some things that need further evaluation. “Now Him who is able to keep you from stumbling.” This verse is not a contradiction to v. 21. Keep here is a different word than in v. 21, but the idea is the same. God provides what you need to enable you to keep yourself in the love of God. If you’re not remaining in God’s love, it’s not because of God, it’s because of you. Stumbling here does not mean sinlessness as some would argue. Peter used the same word in 2 Pet. 1:10 when he said, “Therefore, brethren, be all the more diligent to make certain about His calling and choosing you; for as long as you practice these things, you will never stumble.” The concept is that if you are a true believer, you will never renounce your faith. You will not walk away like the people in 1 Jo. 1:19. God will provide strength to endure regardless of the circumstances. People rarely question their faith when times are good. But they sometimes wonder where God is when times are other than good. Jude is saying that God enables you to persevere, but it’s not all on Him. That’s the background behind his command to keep yourselves in the love of God. It must be intentional and consistent. Each of us has a responsibility to press on and not neglect or abandon the principles of the faith.

How do you handle creepers? Lovingly confront the issues with Scripture and then deal with it. The whole theme of this letter is to be on your guard against false teaching, to be continuously engaged in the faith. Jude is telling us to fight for the faith, not just sit around and enjoy the blessings and bounty of salvation. No one is called to sit on the sidelines, we’re all supposed to be in the game.Jude goes on to say, “And to make you stand in the presence of His glory blameless with great joy.” This goes along with not stumbling. Since God gives you the power to remain in His love, when the day comes for you to stand in His presence, you will be without blame. This is an eschatological term that refers to the Day of Judgment. We stand before His throne perfect because the only way we can stand there is because of the perfect Lamb of God that was sacrificed on our behalf. Our redemption will be fully realized on that day. “To the only God our Savior, through Jesus Christ our Lord be glory, majesty, dominion and authority, before all time and now and forever.” Notice that God is identified as the Savior. This points to the false doctrine taught by the creepers when they denied Jesus Christ as Master and Lord. God is the Savior through the atonement of Jesus Christ. Glory refers to the splendor, beauty, and honor associated with God. Majesty denotes His greatness and how worthy He is of the honor bestowed upon Him. Dominion and authority are closely related. These indicate the vastness of His hand. His sovereignty and control knows no bounds. The attributes in the closing verse always and always will belong to God. Notice Jude says, “Before all time and now and forever.”

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Regardless of what people say or of the claims they make to the contrary, God is God. Nonsensical statements made by Christians and non-Christians does not change who He is. Either He is worth following and serving 24 hours a day or He’s not worth serving at all.

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