Lifelong Learning

8 Jun

LearningYou can check out the podcast Lifelong Learning.

Last week Solomon reminded us of the folly in trusting in the world’s riches and we found out that when we think globally about our finances, we are rich. He referred to the troubler in the house that will have no inheritance. We also saw the wonderful reminder of just how far reaching the impact of a righteous person is – both to his household and the community. This morning, we’ll see some familiar principles that just make plain sense.

In our passage today Solomon writes, “Whoever loves discipline loves knowledge, but he who hates reproof is stupid. A good man will obtain favor from the Lord, but He will condemn a man who devises evil. A man will not be established by wickedness, but the root of the righteous will not be moved. An excellent wife is the crown of her husband, but she who shames him is like rottenness in his bones.” (Pro. 12:1-4)

Education is a lifelong pursuit. In America, we have systems in place to ensure our children are educated with the fundamentals of reading, writing, and arithmetic. Education is so important, there are laws that require parents to have their kids in school. Our government funds public school through taxes in order to educate our kids. Other countries in the world are not so fortunate – the mid-central area of Africa is the world’s worst for education. Research shows that kids who are not educated are at a higher risk for substance abuse, gang activity, and criminal activity. Kids who aren’t educated are also, “more likely to have health issues, experience mental health disorders, and be incarcerated. Why the background? To help us understand the practical application of what Solomon says here. “Whoever loves discipline loves knowledge.” The word translated discipline means instruction. Rom. 15:4 says, “For whatever was written in earlier times was written for our instruction, so that through perseverance and the encouragement of the Scriptures we might have hope.” Everything in Scripture is valuable. It is through the Scriptures that we get to know God better; that we get to know Christ better and understand how the Holy Spirit functions in conjunction with the Father and the Son.

A hunger for God’s Word can be developed and I am an example of that. In the beginning of my walk with Christ, no one that I can remember told me I needed to study God’s Word. Maybe someone did, but I didn’t get it. That’s just one reason why it is so important to have godly people in your life. We have these mentor type of people in nearly every facet of life including school, sports, clubs, and jobs. For some reason, in our walk of faith which is the most import aspect of life we will ever engage in, we prefer to go it alone, to figure it out by ourselves, to neglect it, to dismiss the importance of our faith, or be content with where we are. If our faith were like our other endeavors, we’d be sent back a grade, benched, kicked out of the club, or fired. Why do I keep coming back to the same thing? Because we’re not identifying who our enemy is. We think it’s other people, parents, teachers, bosses and the real enemy prowls around looking for people to destroy. When we deemphasize the importance of the written Word, we fall neatly into his trap. I was unknowingly trapped by Satan until I finally figured out what God was trying to tell me. I sometimes wonder how long He had been telling me and if others around me had told me the same thing, would I have gotten it sooner? It doesn’t matter because I can’t get that time back. What’s important is that you learn from my mistake and don’t repeat what I did. In this area, God’s desire is the same for all of us. You don’t have to be a vocational pastor or engage in vocational ministry to benefit from the principles of Scripture – they are for all people! 1 Pet. 2:2, “like newborn babies, long for the pure milk of the word, so that by it you may grow in respect to salvation.” Matt. 5:6, “Blessed are those who hunger and thirst for righteousness, for they shall be satisfied.” Solomon is telling us that we should have an attitude that expresses a longing, a deep desire to get into the Word. Think of the moment in time when you were physically more hungry or thirsty than you had even been. All you could think about was food. You couldn’t wait to get that meal. That is the natural, physical desire for nourishment; the exact same desire we should have for the spiritual nourishment that sustains us in our walk of faith.

In direct opposition to this Solomon says, “But he who hates reproof is stupid.” Anyone that can have their mistakes corrected, that can broaden their horizons, can learn the better or best way, the right way, the wisest way and yet refuses to learn these things is stupid. Hey Solomon, tell us what you really think. Stupid means lacking intelligence or common sense. Think about how you may have attempted to instruct someone and they refused to listen to you. Think of the person that attempts to put together that toy or piece of furniture, or hang that ceiling fan, but won’t look at the instructions. Think of the person that attempts to repair to a car and there are pieces left over. You try to correct it and they get all bent out and refuse to listen. They’re stupid. Come on, you might be thinking, that’s different. Let me put it in Solomon’s context. I think of all the people that I have had dealings with in a ministry or Bible context that refuse the instructions found in Scripture. They have less experience, less knowledge, less education, less time on this earth, less everything associated with walking by faith, but will not listen to good, solid, biblical guidance. They’re stupid. Harsh you say? Look at the stakes involved. A broken car versus eternity. Overly dramatic? That’s part of Satan’s plan to downplay the importance of walking a life of passionate authenticity for Christ. It does matter what and how we think and it matters what our life looks like.

This segues nicely into the next principle. Solomon then says, “A good man will obtain favor from the Lord.” Don’t confuse this with earning salvation. A good man here is someone that remains good no matter the circumstances. His thoughts are good; his heart is pure; he is in tune with God. The world may be against him, but he remains steadfast in God’s arms. This is the glass half full person, this is the silver lining person, this is the person that continues to keep the mission of this life at the forefront of his mind. Our walk of faith takes no breaks, there is no vacation, there are no off days. The good man seeks to passionately follow Christ all the time, but He will condemn a man who devises evil.”   It’s a straight forward contrast with no deep, hidden meaning. This person cannot be good because he is plotting and planning what is not godly. “A man will not be established by wickedness, but the root of the righteous will not be moved.” This is a neat and tidy restatement of the previous verse. The root of any goodness we have is God. In order to grow big and strong for God, we must be planted in good, fertile soil. We are mighty because of God. He infuses Himself in us. Regardless of how strong the wind blows, we are held firmly by the roots that are planted in God and in His Word.

Here’s another vivid word picture. “An excellent wife is the crown of her husband.” Who wears crowns? Royalty wear crowns and this presents us with the idea that men are the kings of their castle. So what is an excellent wife? Every man in here has an idea of what an excellent wife might look and act like. To save us from ourselves, let’s make sure we define excellence from God’s perspective. Excellent here means extremely good or outstanding. That probably comes as no surprise to you. It also means virtuous. Virtuous means having high moral standards. Remember the morally ugly woman of 11:22? The excellent woman is not morally ugly. Ruth is one of the most wonderful pictures of godliness in Scripture. She is called a woman of excellence in Ruth 3:11. This woman of virtue is not just loving, godly, and morally pure, she is a crown to her husband. This is symbolic of the crown or wreath that grooms often wore at their wedding. The woman of virtue finishes off the man. The opposite is also true. “But she who shames him is like rottenness in his bones.”   Shame here means act shamefully. That’s any type of behavior that could be shameful. Gossip, short tempered, arrogant, conceited, immoral, lazy, etc. Before you women get all antsy on me and call me a caveman and a chauvinist, there are abundant principles regarding the behavior of godly women in Scripture. I am not in favor of restricting the vote of women, or not allowing women to walk alone in public, have a job, drive, or any of those things that we might define as antiquated. Let me be clear, while Scripture calls women the weaker vessel, that does not mean women are not as smart, not as valuable, not as wise, not as knowledgeable, etc. as men. That’s not Solomon’s point here. He is simply saying that a wonderful, godly woman is like putting a crown on her husband’s head. Our wives can and often make us as men look very good. Our wives are often called our better half. When that half causes shame in our lives, it’s like a rottenness that destroys from the inside out.

Part of the lifelong learning we pursue, is a change in our behavior to mimic Christ. He transforms us to look more and more like Him. All of us can change. We should all desire to change to become more and more like Christ.

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