Be Afraid, Be Very Afraid

21 Sep

FearYou can catch the podcast here.

Last week we answered the question about evil triumphing. It won’t. We saw that it’s more profitable to actually work than it is to talk about working. Just because to don’t get a paycheck for your work doesn’t mean that it is not beneficial or profitable. Telling the truth about Jesus Christ can save people from an eternity in hell. Take the opportunities God provides for you to share the love and truth of Jesus. This morning, Solomon issues a very ominous warning.

I hope you’ll grab your Bible and read our passage for today found in Pro. 14:26-31.

How about some more fear? Solomon says, “In the fear of the Lord there is strong confidence, and his children will have refuge.” What kind of fear is he talking about? In his first inaugural address in 1933 FDR said, “The only thing we have to fear is fear itself.” FDR was saying don’t live in what if land. Don’t be afraid of the unknown. Although many folks remember that phrase, if you look at the whole sentence, it becomes even more applicable. “So, first of all, let me assert my firm belief that the only thing we have to fear is fear itself – nameless, unreasoning, unjustified terror which paralyzes needed efforts to convert retreat into advance.”

Solomon has talked about fear before, and it’s not the same as FDR’s fear. In Pro. 3:7 he said, “Fear the Lord and turn away from evil.” In 3:25 he said, “Do not be afraid with sudden fear.” We’ll see in 19:23 that, “The fear of the Lord leads to life.” Remember way back to 1:7 to set the whole book of wisdom up, Solomon said, “The fear of the Lord is the beginning of knowledge.” Solomon is talking about reverence. Reverence means to stand in awe, or have a deep respect for someone or something. As a professing believer, he’s not telling us to be afraid like we’re always looking over our shoulder or we’re cowering in fear. It’s an incredible awe over who God is and what He has accomplished in all that He has done and continues to do in our life and in the lives of those around us. It’s a humbling awareness that He loves us and gave Himself for us, that He cares about us, that He wants to be a part of our lives, that He wants us to recognize Him for who He really is. In Matt. 10:28 Jesus said, “Do not fear those who kill the body but are unable to kill the soul; but rather fear Him who is able to destroy both soul and body in hell.” That reverence leads to strong confidence and trust in God and His Son.

It still amazes me that people of faith don’t have blind trust in Christ. They exercise blind trust in other facets of life, but with God, somehow conclusions are drawn that maybe He doesn’t know what’s going on or that He doesn’t care, or we think He won’t answer our prayers. We have trouble letting go and that’s the root cause. Many folks wouldn’t admit it, but they’re control freaks. What they can’t control freaks them out and frustrates them and leads to panic stricken confusion. I picture God saying, “Come on, I’m here, I haven’t left you, I know what’s going on, I love you, I have plans for you to prosper. Won’t you just trust me?” We must stand on the confession of who Jesus is. He is our protector, our provider, our redeemer, our hope, our passion, our purpose, our assurance, our strong tower, our comfort, our counselor, our righteousness, our healer. He is the Messiah, the Savior, the strong Son of the living God: He is Jesus!

That fear or reverence, “Is a fountain of life, that one may avoid the snares of death.” Fountain gives us the idea of unending satisfaction for the soul. The fountain will never dry up. Jesus said, If anyone is thirsty, let him come to Me and drink. He who believes in Me, as the Scripture said, ‘From his innermost being will flow rivers of living water.’” (Jo. 7:37-38) The only way to have that everlasting fountain is to accept the well head that is Jesus Christ. Solomon is saying what he already said Pro. 13:14: “The teaching of the wise is a fountain of life, to turn aside from the snares of death.” Jesus saves you from death. Likely not physical death, but spiritual death. We are spiritually alive in Jesus.

Next is a verse that needs little explanation. “In a multitude of people is a king’s glory, but in the dearth of people is a prince’s ruin.” If a king has a large kingdom, that generally means he rules well. People want to live in that kingdom and be afforded the protection, safety, and prosperity that comes along with it. The conquering of other lands was not Solomon’s highest priority. During Solomon’s reign, “Judah and Israel were as numerous as the sand that is on the seashore in abundance; they were eating and drinking and rejoicing.”  (1 Ki. 4:20) Without providing for the people, what good is a prince? That’s what he’s talking about here.

Our next set of verses could change your life. In 14:17 Solomon said, “A quick tempered man acts foolishly.” That’s the hot head kind of guy. Now he talks about the mellow guy, “He who is slow to anger has great understanding.” I’m thinking it’s because he actually listens to what’s going on and processes the information. The quick tempered guy just gets mad fast and that causes him to act foolishly. Solomon is now talking about someone that is slow to be offended. He knows how to excuse other people’s faults and he understands that he is not without faults. He is not easily provoked. It’s not that he can’t get riled up, it’s that his patience is great, his understanding is great, and his wisdom is great. That’s why he’s slow to anger. He can get mad, but he chooses to follow wisdom instead. Think about it this way: do you want to be around someone that is going to flip out, or someone that is going to maintain a steady demeanor regardless of the circumstances? Gal. 5:22 says that self-control is a fruit of the Spirit so as believers, we don’t get the luxury to say, “I can’t help it.”

The quick tempered guy? Solomon says he, “Exalts folly” Solomon goes on to say there is a physical benefit to remaining calm. “A tranquil heart is life to the body.” Tranquil means free from disturbance or calm. You want to see what someone is made out of, put them in a stressful or tense situation. When the heart is healthy both morally and physically, the benefit spreads throughout the body. It’s not that this person is stress free; it’s just that he’s learned how to respond and react to that stress. You’ve heard people that say they’re stressed out? It’s used as a justification for all kinds of behavior. “But passion is rottenness to the bones.” Rottenness means suffering from decay. This seems quite strange. I’m passionate about many things. Studying God’s Word. Discipleship. Passion here means envy or jealousy. Jealousy is like a disease that will destroy you from the inside out.

Here’s some random thoughts. Verse 31 says, He who oppresses the poor taunts his Maker, but he who is gracious to the needy honors Him.This is a little bit different than what he said in v. 20-21. Oppress means to keep in subjection and hardship. Being poor does not mean being evil or wicked any more than being wealthy means you have God’s blessing on you. Here Solomon says if you take advantage of, or wrong someone that is poor, watch out. How can we put this in a modern context? Remember a couple of weeks ago I said it’s difficult to define what poor really is. So are there people that prey upon people of lesser means? Think about rent to own places. Think about payday lenders. Think about title loan places. These types of establishments target people they can take advantage of. The rent to own places foster the mentality that you can have it all and they’re willing to let you have it . . . or at least rent it. A local rental center currently offers a 50 inch TV for $64.99 a month. When you read the fine print it says: “Total Monthly Payment: $64.99 + $6.49 (for ASP) = $71.48/month (plus tax) • Total Cost of Ownership: $71.48 x 24 Months = $1,715.52 (plus tax) which equals $1835.61. That same TV retails for $797.99. If you saved for it, you could buy it outright in just over a year. Solomon is warning those types of people to not take advantage of the poor or oppress them. “He who is gracious to the needy honors Him.” How can you be gracious to the needy? Take the time to read Matt. 25:34-40. When you help care for those in need, it honors God. It reflects God’s glory, His mercy, His compassion, and His provision.

Having a healthy fear or reverence for God is a result of understanding who God really is. We stand in awe at who He is and have a deep trust in Him because of His character, His love, and His qualities. We stand amazed in His presence simply because He is. Don’t be quick tempered; be slow to anger. Understand people’s faults and extend grace. Ps. 103:17 says, “But the lovingkindness of the Lord is from everlasting to everlasting on those who fear Him, and His righteousness to children’s children.”

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: