If You’re Happy and You Know It

9 Nov

LuLu PiercyYou can check out the podcast here.

Last time in Proverbs, Solomon said everything about the wicked is a stench to God. God wants everyone to come to the conclusion that He is the only way. His ways are right and holy and pure, but time is running out. There is a time coming that will be too late, where the choice made is an eternal choice. You can do it your way and spend eternity separated from Him or do it His way and spend eternity with Him. It seems like it’s an easy choice. This morning, Solomon talks more about the wicked and how they really are and he minces no words.

Our passage today comes from Pro. 15:12-15 where Solomon says, “A scoffer does not love one who reproves him, he will not go to the wise. A joyful heart makes a cheerful face, but when the heart is sad, the spirit is broken. The mind of the intelligent seeks knowledge, but the mouth of fools feeds on folly. All the days of the afflicted are bad, but a cheerful heart has a continual feast.”

Here’s another way to say it. Solomon really wants us to understand the mindset of the fool. He uses many words to describe what he calls a fool. We’ve seen wicked, unrighteous, naive, simple, treacherous, and now he uses scoffer once again. “A scoffer does not love one who reproves him, he will not go to the wise.” This is the same scoffer from 1:22 who, “delight themselves in their scoffing.” Let me remind you that scoff means to speak of something in a derisive or mocking manner. If you try and correct the scoffer, he will not be happy about it. I can honestly say at first reading, I had no idea why Solomon would use the word love in this verse. As I thought about it, it makes sense. Think about why you tell people the truth even when you are pretty confident it will lead to heartache. I have to conclude the reason we open ourselves up for attacks is that we have an overwhelming sense of love for people. That love can only come from God and we’re willing to lay aside whatever animosity or hatred comes our way because we really believe that Jesus is the only way and that should mean something in our everyday lives. In the context of Proverbs, when wisdom is mentioned, it’s godly wisdom. It’s the knowledge of God that leads to wisdom. The scoffer makes fun of our commitment to Christ, makes fun of our attitudes, the way we raise our kids, the work we do for Jesus and the church, makes fun of every aspect of our lives. They don’t get it. As a result, the scoffer doesn’t come to us for guidance or advice. Even though we may be experiencing the same things they are, our attitude is different, our outlook is different, our countenance is different, our speech is different; everything about us as believers is different and they don’t want to hear about how Jesus is the answer to all of life’s problems.

This is a great segue into the next verse. “A joyful heart makes a cheerful face.” Have you ever heard the expression weaned on a dill pickle? The phrase was coined by Alice Roosevelt Longworth in 1924. She was the oldest daughter of President Theodore Roosevelt and was referring to President Coolidge. Do an image search for Calvin Coolidge and you’ll see exactly what Alice was talking about. Solomon says if you have joy in your heart, then your face should reflect that joy. A smile can change a lot. Neh. 8:10 tells us, “The joy of the Lord is your strength.” The Apostle Paul said in Gal. 5:22 that you have been given joy as part of the spiritual fruit basket. The joy believers have is supernatural joy. Happiness is dependent in circumstances, but real joy comes from the Lord. Joy is found over 200 times in the Bible and often is found alongside shouting and singing. Rejoice is another form of the word and is used over 200 times in the Bible. We often use joy and happiness synonymously, but they are different. A cheerful face can brighten a room, or a house, or a church. I think most of us would prefer to be around people that are full of joy. I don’t want you to think of joy as a temporary emotion.

Solomon knows this because he says, “But when the heart is sad, the spirit is broken.” We see this all the time. Circumstances can cause us to feel sad. That’s why I’m always skeptical of people that act as though nothing in the world is wrong. Their kids are always perfectly behaved and on the honor roll. Their spouse is the most wonderful, loving, caring, kind, thoughtful person in the world that does no wrong. Their job is so awesome all the time that they really would go to work for free. They’ve got the most wonderful family and don’t even have a weird cousin or crazy uncle. Their appliances always work, their car never breaks down, and their house never needs repair, their grass never needs cutting. They never get sick and neither does anyone else in the family. They never struggle to make ends meet and they enjoy vacations two or three times a year. They even have awesome neighbors. There are plenty of things going on around us that will and should cause us sadness. “When my anxious thoughts multiply within me, Your consolations delight my soul.” (Ps. 94:19) The reminders of Scripture about who God is provide the hope for us to trust in Him.

You’ve likely heard the phrase, “A mind is a terrible thing to waste.” That phrase was and continues to be the slogan for the United Negro College Fund. Solomon says, “The mind of the intelligent seeks knowledge.” Notice that it in the present tense. There will never come a time when you know enough, where you have thought enough, where you have studied enough – learning is a lifelong process and that’s what the smart guy does. It’s not knowledge for the sake of knowledge. The expectation is that knowledge leads to wisdom. Matt. 7:7 says, “Seek and you will find.” Too many people want to have found knowledge without doing the seeking. Peter commands us to, “grow in the grace and knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ.” (2 Pet. 3:18) Again the contrast to the person seeking knowledge is the fool. “But the mouth of fools feeds on folly.” Picture a buffet of nonsense and that’s what the fool feeds on. He eats foolishness like a ravenous wolf. That’s what satisfies him. He is driven by passion and a hunger for foolishness. That’s why it seems like foolish people get foolisher.

Is it really that bad for the fool? He eats all of the metaphorical food he wants on an endless buffet of nonsense. Can it really be that bad being foolish? “All the days of the afflicted are bad.” When Solomon uses the word all, he means every. The term afflicted is used synonymously with wicked, foolish, simple, naïve, scoffer, etc. Every day is bad because there is no relationship with Christ. There is no rest in Him, no comfort in Him, no strength in Him, no patience in Him, no love in Him, no perseverance in Him, there is nothing in Him because the foolish do not know Him. “But a cheerful heart has a continual feast.” All the things the fool lacks because he does not know God are available in Christ for the righteous. Endless comfort, strength, hope, mercy, grace, and love as well as an unending buffet of spiritual nourishment.  It’s bad for the fool just because he does not know God and it is good for the righteous simply because he does know God.

If you’re happy and you know, then your life should surely show it. As Christians we are cheerful not because of the ever changing circumstances of life. We are cheerful because regardless of those circumstances, Jesus is there. Smile because of Jesus.

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