Tag Archives: Empty Tomb

The Miracle of Easter

17 Apr

I’ve got big news: April the giraffe has given birth! Not only is the womb empty, the tomb is empty! Today, Easter is observed all over the world, but do we really understand this day that many people celebrate? Is it just another consumer holiday where we look forward to seeing everyone’s new outfits, finding eggs, and eating jelly beans, chocolate, and peeps? Maybe you enjoy Easter because it generally marks the beginning of Spring. I don’t want you to miss the miraculous and eternal significance of Easter. I don’t want to get ahead of myself, so let’s go back in time from the first Easter to a week or so earlier. As you’re turning to Luke 19:28, earlier in Luke 19, there is the miraculous transformation of Zaccheus; then there is the parable of the talents or minas and we come to what is called the triumphal entry.

Take a look at our passage from Luke 19:28-40.

Who is this Jesus? The name Jesus brings many thoughts to people’s minds.  Names are like that; they mean a lot. Sometimes nicknames are commonly associated with people and are instantaneously recognized. Old Blue Eyes – Frank Sinatra. The King of Pop – Michael Jackson. The King – Elvis. Bruce Springsteen was the Boss. Gordon Sumner is better known as Sting. Michael Jordan is known as Air Jordan. Our Secretary of Defense is James Mad Dog Mattis. There are the not so great people like Ivan the Terrible, Jack the Ripper, Bloody Mary, and Vlad the Impaler. Biblically we have John the Baptizer and Lydia the seller of purple. Few people call him Thomas without preceding it with doubting.

These descriptive names are no different for Jesus. In Matt. 1:21 an angel appeared to Joseph and told him, “She will bear a Son; and you shall call His name Jesus, for He will save His people from their sins.” Jesus means Jehovah is salvation. Jesus most often referred to Himself as the Son of Man. He is known as the Messiah. The Light of the world. The Prince of Peace. The bright and morning star. He is the alpha and the omega. He is the redeemer, the advocate, the bread of life. He is the power of God. He is the Lamb of God, the good shepherd, the high priest. He is the King of kings and the Lord of lords. He is the resurrection and the life. That’s who Jesus is. This Jesus was loved by people from all walks of life. This is the Jesus that the prophet Micah said would come to rule Israel; One whose, “Goings forth are from long ago, from the days of eternity.” While loved and adored by the common people, this Jesus was despised by the religious groups of the day – the Pharisees and the Sadducees. Jesus upset the apple cart; He rocked the boat; He went against the flow, He said things that were different than what those religious people had been taught and what they believed. They called Jesus a blasphemer, they judged Jesus because He hung out with the less desirables; the tax collectors and sinners. They accused Him of violating the Sabbath because He encouraged His disciples to pick grain when they were hungry. They didn’t like this, in fact, “The scribes and the Pharisees were watching Him closely to see if He healed on the Sabbath, so that they might find reason to accuse Him.” (Luke 6:7) Jesus taught on the Sabbath, Jesus healed on the Sabbath.

So now we know who Jesus is, but why do we need Jesus? The religious crowd of the day despised Jesus because He threatened their power, their control, their desire to be elevated above others, their desire to be better than anyone else, their desire to control their own destiny, their desire and requirement for everyone to follow the Law. The Law was an interesting thing. Various religions and even denominations attempt to control people by requiring the strict following of a set of rules and regulations. Rom. 3:19-20 says,  Now we know that whatever the Law says, it speaks to those who are under the Law, so that every mouth may be closed and all the world may become accountable to God; because by the works of the Law no flesh will be justified in His sight; for through the Law comes the knowledge of sin.”  Even though the Pharisees wanted everyone to keep the Law, they were powerless to keep it – all the Law did was show people they were law breakers. We need Jesus because no matter how good we think we are, the Bible says there is not a single person that is good.

The Bible is very clear about our need for redemption. We need redemption because according to Rom. 6:6 we are slaves to sin. Sin owns us, it is our master. Rom. 3:23 says, “All have sinned.” 1 Jo. 1:8 says, “If we say we have no sin, we deceive ourselves.” Rom. 6:23 says, “The wages of sin is death.” What is sin? If we redefine what sin is, it’s easier to deal with. In our culture, we conform to the idea that personal feelings are the barometer of right and wrong, of morality and truth. We seek comfort and the least resistant path. We seek to please ourselves. We listen to so called “Christian teachers” or influential people who make us feel better about following our own path, about living in sin. Instead of calling people to repentance and authentic Christian living, these people refuse to call sin what God calls sin. We have a whole new generation of people that have succumbed to cultural pressure that it’s intolerant, judgmental, and unloving to declare God’s truth as absolute. I love Paul’s description of this found in Gal. 5:19-21. “The deeds of the flesh are evident.” Evident is from the word that mean plainly recognized. These are the things of the flesh – they are incompatible with a life that follows God. Left to our own devices, we cannot enter the Kingdom of Heaven.

We know who Jesus is, and we know why we need Jesus, now what should we do with Jesus? In answering this very question to the Jews that gathered in the treasury at the temple in Jo. 8:34-36: “Jesus answered them, ‘Truly, truly, I say to you, everyone who commits sin is the slave of sin. ‘The slave does not remain in the house forever; the son does remain forever. So if the Son makes you free, you will be free indeed.’”         There is freedom in Christ. It’s freedom from the penalty of sin, not from the consequences. God will not and cannot allow us to get away with sin, but don’t expect to see someone’s nose grow if they tell a lie. Our cure then, comes not by redefining sin or by avoiding it. Our cure comes by admitting our sin, turning from it and receiving Jesus Christ as Lord and Savior. Easter is about hope, it’s about life; it’s about fulfilled promises; it’s about Jesus. Maybe you’re thinking, “I want to be free, how do I get this freedom?” To answer that question, we need to go again to the standard of truth. Remember that each of us is a sinner, we have all done wrong. Rom. 6:23 says, “For the wages of sin is death, but the free gift of God is eternal life in Christ Jesus our Lord.” As with any gift, you must accept it; just because it has your name on it does not make it yours until you receive it. Maybe you’re thinking that you need to try harder to be good and righteous. No, the answer to sin is not to try harder to avoid it or change who you are. No matter how hard you try, no matter how good you are, it’s not enough. Eph. 2:8-9 says, “For by grace you have been saved through faith; and that not of yourselves, it is the gift of God; not as a result of works, so that no one may boast.” Rom. 10:9 says, “If you confess with your mouth Jesus as Lord, and believe in your heart that God raised Him from the dead, you will be saved.” Confess is a great word. It means the same thing as agree. In other words, when you confess to God your failure to meet His standard or admit your wrongdoings, you are agreeing with Him. Maybe you’re thinking God won’t accept me like I am. Pastor Ian if you only knew about me. Are you thinking, when I give up ___________, I will be good enough and then I will follow Christ. Here’s the good news: “But God demonstrates His own love toward us, in that while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us.” (Rom. 5:8) We don’t have to try harder because God knows that apart from Christ, we can do nothing. (Jo. 15:5) Rom. 10:13: “For ‘WHOEVER WILL CALL ON THE NAME OF THE LORD WILL BE SAVED.’” It is a guarantee. Becoming a Christian is a choice; it is a decision only you can make for yourself. Being a Christian really means being a follower of Christ. God changes your heart, changes your attitude, and you joyfully want to follow Jesus. It’s not something you do begrudgingly. Being a follower of Christ gives you freedom! You are not a Christian because you live in America or because you attend church, or because you pray or read the Bible, or go to a Bible study. You are a Christian because you have made a decision to trust in what Christ did to pay the penalty for sin; you choose to follow Christ. Paul gives us this hope in Rom. 6:10-11, “For the death that He died, He died to sin once for all; but the life that He lives, He lives to God. Even so consider yourselves to be dead to sin, but alive to God in Christ Jesus.” “To all who received him, to those who believed in his name, he gave the right to become children of God.” (Jo. 1:12)

So how did we get to the point of death? What began just five or so days earlier as Jesus rode into Jerusalem on a colt with people waving palm branches and expressing their adoration for this man from Galilee, all that adoration was overwhelmed by the crowds in Jerusalem that demanded His death by crucifixion. They got what they asked for and Jesus was sentenced to die on a cross for being found guilty of nothing. Jesus dies a horrible death on the cross and was buried in a tomb. The rest of the story is found in Luke 24:1-9. Easter is all about the penalty Jesus Christ paid to cover our sin debt. He shed His blood for you because of His incredible, unending, and unconditional love. He is not here because He is risen. Easter is all about the resurrection of Jesus Christ and the new life that He can give you.

You have heard about who Jesus is and why we need Jesus. You have heard about what you should do with Jesus now there remains just one question. What will you do about what you know?

Is There Eternal Life?

9 Apr

You can listen to the podcast here.

Today is Easter. This day is of great significance in the life of every Christian. With all the Easter sales around, non-Christians often ask the question, “Is there life after death?” Job asked the question, “If a man dies, will he live again?” It’s a question most people ask themselves at some point. There are people that seek to prolong their lives here on earth as long as they can. Jesus asked the question, “For what does it profit a man to gain the whole world, and forfeit his soul?” (Mark 8:36) The longer you live, the more you realize that life is short. Today we’ll answer the question, “Is there eternal life?”

Paul says in 1 Cor. 15:1-2, “Now I make known to you, brethren, the gospel which I preached to you, which also you received, in which also you stand, by which also you are saved, if you hold fast the word which I preached to you, unless you believed in vain.”

Paul begins this passage with what Jesus did. The word gospel here comes from the word that means good news. The resurrection of Jesus who is the Christ provides proof positive that there is life after death. Verses 3-5 contain the foundation of our Christian faith. It says, “For I delivered to you as of first importance what I also received, that Christ died for our sins according to the Scriptures, and that He was buried, and that He was raised on the third day according to the Scriptures, and that He appeared to Cephas, then to the twelve.” Prophecy in the Old Testament predicted that Messiah was going to die. It said that Jesus would be led like a sheep to the slaughter. His death was not the accidental death of a martyr. It was the deliberate death of a person who offered His life as a sacrifice. On that first Easter morning Jesus Christ walked out of that tomb as a living being. Later when Mary Magdalene and the other Mary went to the tomb to anoint His body, they discovered the stone had been rolled away and the tomb was empty. In Luke 24:6-7 the angel said, “Why do you seek the living One among the dead? He is not here, but He has risen. Remember how He spoke to you while He was still in Galilee, saying that the Son of Man must be delivered into the hands of sinful men, and be crucified, and on the third day rise again?”

Paul goes on to say, “And that He appeared to Cephas, then to the twelve. After that He appeared to more than five hundred brethren at one time, most of whom remain until now, but some have fallen asleep; then He appeared to James, then to all the apostles.” (1 Cor. 15:5-7) After the resurrected Christ appeared to all those people, in v. 8 Paul says, “I know that Jesus lives because I saw Him myself.” Before Paul met the Lord Jesus Christ, he was known as Saul. When Christ appeared to him on the road to Damascus, Saul was not the great man of God that wrote 13 books of the N. T. He was on his way to Damascus with letters in his hand from the high priest giving him permission to bind anyone that believed in the truth of Jesus and bring them to Jerusalem. Acts 9 tells us how God intervened in his life and radically transformed him into the man that we have come to know and love named Paul. I encourage you to read this incredible transformation. And now Paul is confused as to why people would deny the reality of life after death. He says, “Now if Christ is preached, that He has been raised from the dead, how do some among you say, there is no resurrection of the dead?” (1 Cor. 15:12) Jesus is not standing here and I would guess that no one in here would say they’ve ever seen Jesus physically, but that doesn’t mean He doesn’t exist. We’ve got plenty of Scriptural evidence as well as non-biblical evidence to support this fact. Maybe you discount the Bible as the true Word of God. What I know is what Christ has done and continues to do in my life so if you tried to tell me that Jesus did not rise again, I would take exception with you. It’s not just me though, Jesus has radically transformed millions of people. Each person has the choice to believe or not. Jesus said, “I am the resurrection and the life; he who believes in Me will live even if he dies, and everyone who lives and believes in Me will never die.” (John 11:25-26) Jesus proved there is life after death in His own life and He’ll prove it in your life too.

If there is life after death, what is it like? Great question. In 1 Cor. 15:20 Jesus demonstrated this life after death. Paul wrote, “But now Christ has been raised from the dead, the first fruits of those who are asleep.” (1 Cor. 15:20) First fruits refers to the O.T. practice of giving the first part of the harvest to the Lord as an offering. Since this is the first part of the harvest, more is to come. In other words, Paul is saying that the resurrection of Christ is not the one and only resurrection, it is the first of what is to come. “Beloved, now we are children of God, and it has not appeared as yet what we will be. We know that when He appears, we will be like Him, because we will see Him just as He is.” (1 Jo. 3:2) If you want to know what it’s like for a Christian to die and live again, look at Jesus. There are two things we need to know about this life after death. First, there was a separation of the body. Jesus’ last words before He died were, “Father, INTO YOUR HANDS I COMMIT MY SPIRIT.” (Lu. 23:46) His body died and was subsequently buried, but His Spirit went to be with the Father. To the thief hanging next to Him, Jesus said, “Truly I say to you, today you shall be with Me in Paradise.” (Lu. 23:43) When our bodies die, our spirits live on in eternity. Paul was emphatic in 1 Cor. 5:8, “We are of good courage, I say, and prefer rather to be absent from the body and to be at home with the Lord.” Second, there is a resurrection of the body. We don’t come back to earth to take over some random person’s body, and we don’t spend a period of time in an undisclosed location to have our sins purged so we can go to heaven. Jesus left behind the cloth that His body was wrapped in. After three days He came back into the tomb to re-inhabit the body He left behind, but it had been changed. He showed people the nail scars in His hands and feet. But it’s not only Jesus that will be resurrected. “Do not marvel at this; for an hour is coming, in which all who are in the tombs will hear His voice, and will come forth; those who did the good deeds to a resurrection of life, those who committed the evil deeds to a resurrection of judgment.” (Jo. 5:28-29) What about those that have been cremated or blown up in a war? Remember that it was God that spoke the universe and all that it contains into existence. He made man from the dust of the ground; putting together a body is no big challenge for Him. Following the death of Lazarus, Jesus told Martha that He would take care of it. Martha protested, “Lord, by this time there will be a stench, for he has been dead four days.  Jesus said to her, “Did I not say to you that if you believe, you will see the glory of God?” (Jo. 11:39-40) At the place where Lazarus was buried, Jesus commanded, “Lazarus, come forth.” The man who had died came forth, bound hand and foot with wrappings, and his face was wrapped around with a cloth.” (Jo. 11:43-44) Four days, four weeks, four months, four years, 4000 years is all the same. “For the Lord Himself will descend from heaven with a shout, with the voice of the archangel and with the trumpet of God, and the dead in Christ will rise first. Then we who are alive and remain will be caught up together with them in the clouds to meet the Lord in the air, and so we shall always be with the Lord.” (1 Thes. 4:16-17) Some might not be able to wrap their brain around that; perhaps it’s too strange. How a baby comes into being is pretty strange, yet no one would deny it. One egg, one sperm coming together – invisible to the naked eye. They form a cell that divides, and divides, and divides. 18 days later a tiny heartbeat begins. Some nine months later and out comes a little human being completely furnished with little hands and feet. Every life that is conceived is miraculous; but it happens so often that we dismiss it.

After Jesus was resurrected, He appeared to the disciples in the upper room. Read Luke 24:37-48. Jesus ate after He rose from the dead. I’m thinking we’ll be able to do the same. We’ll not be floating around playing a harp wearing a halo. We’ll have bodies like Christ’s resurrected body. 1 Cor 15:35  says, “But someone will say, “How are the dead raised? And with what kind of body do they come?” Paul responds to this question. Take a look at 1 Cor. 15:36-42. Fish were created with scales so they can live in the water. Birds were created with hollow bones and with feathers so they could fly. God is certainly able to create us with an immortal body that will never perish, spoil, or fade. So if you’re old and decrepit, you’ll be renewed. If you’re blind, you’ll be able to see; the deaf shall hear again. Paul finishes by saying, “But when this perishable will have put on the imperishable, and this mortal will have put on immortality, then will come about the saying that is written, “DEATH IS SWALLOWED UP in victory. O DEATH, WHERE IS YOUR VICTORY? O DEATH, WHERE IS YOUR STING?” (1 Cor. 15:54-55) Just as the disciples recognized Jesus, we’ll recognize one another and the people that have gone before us. There are numerous Old and New Testament examples that confirm this.

So just one question remains. How can we attain eternal life? If life after death could be purchased, what would you pay for it? If I told you all the glorious things of heaven, what you would experience there, who you would meet, what kind of house you would live in: how much would it be worth to you? If I could guarantee that your life after death would be better than the life you now enjoy, how much would you be willing to spend on it? Fortunately, heaven can be purchased: unfortunately we can’t pay the price. Heaven is the dwelling place of God, a place of perfection, and we forfeited our right to be there because of our sin. The price for entry is the blood of a perfect person, and we just don’t measure up. We can’t earn heaven and we don’t deserve heaven, but the good news is that Jesus Christ stepped in to pay the debt for us. 1 Cor. 15:56-57 says, “The sting of death is sin, and the power of sin is the law; but thanks be to God, who gives us the victory through our Lord Jesus Christ.” The victory comes from believing in what Jesus did on the cross. So why would you refuse this great offer? We have a deep love for sin. On one hand, eternal life doesn’t cost anything. On the other hand, it costs everything. God’s desire is for us to turn from sin to Him. We leave our past behind us and become new. A new life, new goals, new desires, new passions all put in our hearts by a loving, holy, and perfect God. Being a follower of Christ is not in what you have to give up; that’s the wrong perspective. Personal pride gets in the way of this great offer. There are plenty of smart people in this room and maybe you’re too smart for your own good. There is lots of evidence to verify the resurrection of Jesus, but you weren’t there so maybe you doubt. You weren’t at the signing of the Declaration of Independence, but you believe it happened. It takes faith.

Eph. 2:8-9 reminds us, “For by grace you have been saved through faith; and that not of yourselves, it is the gift of God; not as a result of works, so that no one may boast.” Faith is a simple yet difficult thing. It is a choice.