Tag Archives: Speak

Timing is Everything

11 Jan

TimingListen to the podcast here.

When we were last in Proverbs before Thanksgiving, Solomon told us to seek guidance from others. Seek answers from God and get good counsel to confirm it. If something is weighing heavily on you and you think it’s from God, speak with someone that will provide you with solid, biblical, godly, and timely guidance from Scripture. There is rarely anything God gives us that must begin immediately. It took God six days to create the heavens and the earth and all that is within it. Paul spent years walking around Asia and Europe to get the message of Jesus out to the Gentiles and it took more than a century for Noah to build a boat. This morning, Solomon gives us several principles that stand alone.

Take the time to read Pro. 15:23-26.

There is a time and a place to speak. We’ve said before that not everything needs to be said and what does need to be said doesn’t necessarily need to be said right now. Solomon starts by saying, “A man has joy in an apt answer, and how delightful is a timely word.” This is definitely a feel good verse. It’s a verse suitable to put on a bumper sticker, Facebook meme, or e-card. But good things said can be off putting when they’re spoken at the wrong time. The wise person knows when to say that good word and when to remain silent. Notice that the perspective is from the giver of the good and timely words. We saw in the last Proverbs message that we should seek wise counsel and it’s from the perspective of receiving that counsel and the joy of getting good guidance. Here Solomon is talking about the blessing of giving that good guidance. It’s not a prideful thing in order for us to confirm how awesome we are. People sometimes come to me for advice and counsel. I know I give good advice because I just tell folks what the Bible says. I try to be persuasive, convincing, and confident in the words I say and it gives me joy and a good feeling that people are listening to the Bible. I get great joy in knowing that the Word is alive and able to help people that need its comfort, guidance, wise counsel, and all the other tangible things that come from within its living pages. You have that same opportunity to give the life changing bread of life!

Here’s another meme worthy quote. “The path of life leads upward for the wise that he may keep away from Sheol below.” The path of life is the same as the way is the same as the gate is the same as the road is the same as the highway. They’re all different ways of saying stay on the path that leads to righteousness. Stay on the path that leads to the Promised Land. Stay on the road that leads to eternity with God. The wise individual knows the dangers that lurk just off the path. When you stay on the path, you will keep away from Sheol, the place of the dead which lies below. Paul said, For our citizenship is in heaven, from which also we eagerly wait for a Savior, the Lord Jesus Christ.” (Phil. 3:20) He also said, “Therefore if you have been raised up with Christ, keep seeking the things above, where Christ is, seated at the right hand of God.” (Col. 3:1) Too often we think of earth as our eternal home and all our efforts are used to secure heaven on earth which just can’t happen.

Don’t be filled with pride. Solomon says, “The Lord will tear down the house of the proud.” There is a difference in parental pride and personal pride. Speaking to Jesus in Lu. 3:22 God said, “You are My beloved Son, in You I am well-pleased.” That’s the idea of parental pride – it’s a delight or satisfaction in your children. Of course that can spill over fairly easily into personal pride when we think our kids are better than everyone else’s kids. It’s typically manifested in statements like, “My child would never do that.” Solomon is talking about an elevated sense of self-worth. It’s a theme repeated often in Scripture. Pride is the principle that it’s all about me. Ps. 34:3 says, “O magnify the Lord with me, and let us exalt His name together.” God is at the pinnacle of humanity; He is at the top of everything and does not take a back seat to anything that we consider important. When you magnify yourself over the Lord, you set yourself up in opposition to the first commandment that says, “You shall have no other gods before Me.” (Ex. 20:3) That’s what pride is, right? It’s the idea of self-centeredness. It’s the idea that the world revolves around you. Over and over God says, “It’s all about Me.” That’s what the first commandment is about.       That’s why we have a commandment against idolatry. The house of the proud will come crashing down. Maybe not physically, but that also might be true. God will do what He must to get people to acknowledge that He is what the universe revolves around. There is coming a day where everyone will recognize Jesus for who He is. “For this reason also, God highly exalted Him, and bestowed on Him the name which is above every name, so that at the name of Jesus every knee will bow, of those who are in heaven and on earth and under the earth, and that every tongue will confess that Jesus Christ is Lord, to the glory of God the Father.” (Phil. 2:9-11)

The house of the proud will be destroyed, “But He will establish the boundary of the widow.” Being a widow in Scripture is not always glamorous. There are special provisions given to widows because their primary source of support is gone. The church is supposed to, “Honor widows who are widows indeed.” (1 Tim. 5:3) For all the effort and work that goes into accumulating things here, all will be lost, but the boundary of the widow? God will expand her territory and take care of those that are oppressed and afflicted.

I want to hit one more principle. “Evil plans are an abomination to the Lord.” Remember abomination conveys the idea of rotting flesh. Those plans don’t have to come to fruition for God to be displeased. We’ve seen this before. Back in Pro. 6:18, having, “A heart that devises wicked plans,” is in the list of things God hates. Remember the heart is the seat of emotion. What comes out of the mouth reveals what’s inside the heart. When wickedness resides in the heart, evil thoughts and darkness result. When Jesus is in the heart, righteousness and goodness reside there. Because what’s in the heart flows out, the result is Jesus. “Pleasant words are pure.” By definition, goodness and righteousness are there because of Jesus and His working in your life. Jesus being Lord of your life leads to pleasant thoughts, which leads to pleasant words, which leads to pleasing Jesus and many of the people that cross your path. David said, “Let the words of my mouth and the meditation of my heart be acceptable in Your sight, O Lord, my rock and my Redeemer.” (Ps.19:14)

It’s good to be back in Proverbs. Be sensitive to when it’s best to talk and when it’s best to remain silent. Words used at the right time in the right place can bring great comfort and joy to others. Keep on the path of righteousness, don’t be prideful, and check your plans with God before putting them into play.

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Wisdom Speaks

7 Jul

SpeakYou can listen or download the podcast here.

Last week Solomon concluded his introductory warning by telling his son to be careful who is friends are. One bad apple can spoil the whole bunch. This morning, a concept speaks to us for the first time in this book as Solomon utilizes personification.

Grab your Bible and read Proverbs 1:20-33.

We begin with wisdom’s appeal to listeners. The easiest and most utilized excuse for wrong doing is ignorance. We see it all over. Someone commits some form of wrong or evil behavior and the conclusion is they just didn’t know any better. That may be true for some people, but you cannot make a blanket statement that ignorance is justification. Wisdom is in the noisy streets and at the entrance to the cities. Wisdom is not something elusive. She’s not like some wise old sage that you have to climb a mountain in order to get her insight. She is out there trying to make her voice heard. She roams the streets shouting for all to hear. She’s looking for someone to teach, someone that will take her up on her incredible insight. All we have to do is open up God’s Word and we find wisdom.

In v. 22, wisdom speaks about three types of people. Remember the naïve one are simple minded. This verse gives us an indication that they don’t have to stay that way. They love being the way they are. They’re sort of like the kid that doesn’t want to go to school because they know everything they need to know. The scoffers just love to scoff. They ridicule the things of God, the ways of God and any who will choose to follow God. Scoffers come in many forms and look like ordinary people. Sometimes they’re subtle like when they lovingly say, “God wouldn’t want you to live like this.” Sometimes they’re more overt by denying the authority of God’s Word. And of course, the list would not be complete without the fool. The word used here is not quite as strong as the word used in v. 7. This guy rejects wisdom and has become morally insensitive. He is so occupied with the things of the world that the things of God are of no concern to him. We’ll see in later chapters that this type of person is a source of grief to his parents. According to chapter 26, you can’t talk sense to a fool because he’s a fool. Talking to a fool is a waste of time. Ps. 1:1 “How blessed is the man who does not walk in the counsel of the wicked, nor stand in the path of sinners, nor sit in the seat of scoffers!” It’s difficult to determine when to let go of a person like this. If your face is blue, it’s probably time.

Look at wisdom’s guidance. Wisdom issues a pretty clear directive to the people she’s screaming to. It’s never too late to, “Turn to my reproof” she says in v. 23. The ignorant can learn, the scoffers can cease their scoffing, the fool can gain knowledge.   She says, “Behold, I will pour out my spirit on you; I will make my words known to you.” She’ll do this in any way she can. Ignorance is not bliss and is no excuse or rationale to act in a manner that is inconsistent with God. God is extraordinarily patient with us and with those that rebel against Him, but there will come a day when He has had all he can take. Wisdom called, and you refused. Wisdom stretched out her hand, but you refused to grab hold of her. You neglected all of her counsel, instruction, and correction. You have passed the point of no return. As a result of this, wisdom takes on some very realistic qualities that would be deemed judgmental, hurtful, and just plain offensive. Look at vs. 26-27. These are hard words. Laugh and mock at your calamity? What kind of loving God does that? The kind of loving God that declares there is judgment for sin. The kind of loving God that has standards and holds people accountable for those standards. The kind of loving God that has preserved His Word so we can learn, grow, and be transformed by its power. The kind of loving God that puts wonderful, godly, passionate, and authentic people in our paths to instruct, train, and guide us. Don’t blame God when you’re falling without a parachute. Don’t blame God when you’re sinking in an ocean without a life ring. This sounds incredibly harsh, doesn’t it?

Don’t be shocked, they know their folly. There will come a time when a person realizes all of the truth that has been thrown at them. There is the saying better late than never, but that doesn’t apply here. If you reject wisdom’s cries, judgment comes. It seems too often people only want help when they’re experiencing the consequences for their actions. That’s what is happening here. It’s like people are told over and over, “Don’t do that.” “That’s not a wise decision.” “Be careful.” “You can’t afford that.” “He (or she) is no good for you.” All of those warnings are dismissed and low and behold the consequences arrive and the naïve ones, the scoffers, and the fool cries out, “Help! Help!”

Wisdom responds in vs. 28-30. They’ll call, but there is no answer. They’ll go looking, but wisdom will not be found. Why? Because when there was plenty of time to be proactive, these people chose to be carefree, chose to be complacent, chose to be clueless. They chose to ignore God. And so their consequence is found in vs. 31-32.

The voice of wisdom is the voice of God. 1 Cor. 1:30 says, “But by His doing you are in Christ Jesus, who became to us wisdom from God, and righteousness and sanctification, and redemption.” There is a but at the end and it represents a vivid contrast. Verse 33 says, “But he who listens to me shall live securely and will be at ease from the dread of evil.” As we eagerly and patiently wait for Christ to return, we are the voice of Christ as we share His power and His redemption. We become the voice of wisdom, because we have the power of Christ in our lives. We don’t hide our light under a basket; we lift it high for all to see.